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Bad Diet in Youth May Up Early Breast Cancer Risk


Bad Diet in Youth May Up Early Breast Cancer Risk
Cherry Hill Courier Post

"A diet high in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and red and processed meat makes it more likely that you may experience early onset breast cancer," said study senior author Karin Michels. She is chair of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Heal

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